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jeringa
19 posts
Unix startup scripts
Casey,

If you have any question re *nix systems let me know
Been a *nix sysadmin for many many years; Always glad to help out

Contact me direct if you want to prefer this offline :)

General rule of thumb though is add a (ba)sh script into /etc/init.d/
then Symlink a name from /etc/rc3.d/S99mystuff -> /etc/init.d/mystuff
I normally just copy an existing script in init.d & hack in what I need


or cheap 'n cheesy just add the commands to the end of /etc/rc.local
If the programs don't fork themselves into the background add a " &" at the end of the command line to force it to. (don't type the "'s)
Mārtiņš Možeiko
2237 posts / 1 project
Unix startup scripts
Edited by Mārtiņš Možeiko on
Not sure in what context this is, but /etc/init.d won't work for everybody. Every Linux distribution can use whatever init system they want.

For example, I only use Arch Linux. And it doesn't have /etc/init.d or /etc/rcX.d or /etc/rc.local anymore. It used to have BSD like init scripts. Now it uses systemd to start up services at boot. I actually prefer systemd way. It looks to me more organized than bunch of scripts in bunch of folders (but that's my preference).
498 posts
Unix startup scripts
Edited by ratchetfreak on
mmozeiko
Not sure in what context this is, but /etc/init.d won't work for everybody. Every Linux distribution can use whatever init system they want.

For example, I only use Arch Linux. And it doesn't have /etc/init.d or /etc/rcX.d or /etc/rc.local anymore. It used to have BSD like init scripts. Now it uses systemd to start up services at boot. I actually prefer systemd way. It looks to me more organized than bunch of scripts in bunch of folders (but that's my preference).


Casey had a few problems getting the twitterbot to do what it needed to do over the weekend because the server rebooted (for whatever reason).

All he really needs is someone that can tell him (preferably with references) for his server's distro what the on startup procedure is.